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Infrastructure projects

The importance of infrastructure for sustained economic development is well recognized in a country. India will be a high growth economy over the next decade. India’s infrastructure spending at present accounts for just 4 per cent of GDP as compared to china’s 9 percent. This emphasizes the need to step up expenditure in this sector. The need of the hour is significant private-sector participation. Physical infrastructure covering transportation, power and communication through its backward and forward linkages facilitates growth; social infrastructure including water supply, sanitation, sewage disposal, education and health, which are in the nature of primary services, has a direct impact on the quality of life. The feasibility of infrastructure projects in ports, roads, airports and railways with private-sector majority ownership is already evident. The government also expects a substantial increase in the share of private sector investments in infrastructure from 19 per cent in the Tenth Plan to around 30 per cent in the Eleventh Plan. The biggest increase in private participation is expected in roads (from 5 per cent to 36), ports (47 per cent to 74 per cent) and railways (less than 1 per cent to 20 per cent). The Planning Commission estimates that the remaining infrastructure investments will be funded by the central and state government.

Urban infrastructure is reeling under pressure with the transport infrastructure crumbling and a shortfall of over 20 million housing units. Besides, water supply and sanitation systems in most cities are in urgent need of upgradation. The primary healthcare facilities in India require significant additional investment.

The efficacy of private sector participation in infrastructure development would be contingent upon the capability to commercialize these projects whereby recovery of investments would be through a system of user charges. There is a potential for public private partnerships (PPPs) to contribute more and help bridge the infrastructure gap in India. There has been considerable progress in the last ten years in attracting private investment into the infrastructure sectors; first in telecommunications, then in ports and roads, and in individual projects in other sectors. Forty-six percent of plan outlay has been earmarked for developing infrastructure as the sector has received much priority in the annual budget of India for 2010-2011.

For a long term investor, the investment opportunities are significant across a wide spectrum of infrastructure assets. Recent initiatives such as permitting take-out financing by India Infrastructure Finance Company (IIFCL) are encouraging as this enables commercial banks to rotate capital and infuse additional liquidity into the system. There is no doubt that Indian infrastructure is poised for a great leap forward.

We can provide you detailed project reports on the following topics. Please select the projects of your interests.

Each detailed project reports cover all the aspects of business, from analysing the market, confirming availability of various necessities such as plant & machinery, raw materials to forecasting the financial requirements. The scope of the report includes assessing market potential, negotiating with collaborators, investment decision making, corporate diversification planning etc. in a very planned manner by formulating detailed manufacturing techniques and forecasting financial aspects by estimating the cost of raw material, formulating the cash flow statement, projecting the balance sheet etc.

We also offer self-contained Pre-Investment and Pre-Feasibility Studies, Market Surveys and Studies, Preparation of Techno-Economic Feasibility Reports, Identification and Selection of Plant and Machinery, Manufacturing Process and or Equipment required, General Guidance, Technical and Commercial Counseling for setting up new industrial projects on the following topics.

Many of the engineers, project consultant & industrial consultancy firms in India and worldwide use our project reports as one of the input in doing their analysis.

We can modify the project capacity and project cost as per your requirement.
We can also prepare project report on any subject as per your requirement.

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CO-GENERATION POWER PLANT BASED ON BAGASSE - Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue, Plant Economics, Working Capital Requirement, Plant Layout

Co-generation plant based on Bagasse is the need of the hour in the perspective of the power generation required and its demand is increasing considerably. There stands an imperative need for the setting up of power plant based on bagasse, which is a waste product from sugar industries. Co-generation is the simultaneous production of process heat and electric power using single fuel. Biomass fuel can also be used in co-generation plants for enhancing their efficiency. Co-generation facilities increase economic viability and profitability of an industry. In sugarcane industries it is most popular environment friendly way of producing electricity using sugarcane bagasse. Co-generation projects based on agro waste like rice husk, bagasse etc. as fuel result is lowering the cost of energy generation, low capital investment, higher profitability of plant. It is a lucrative project with very bright future prospects. A new entrepreneur can venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 15 MW Plant & machinery: 850 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 1746 Lakhs
Return: 53.00%Break even: 46.00%
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CO-GENERATION POWER PLANT BASED ON BAGASSE - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

Co-generation plant based on Bagasse is the need of the hour in the perspective of the power generation required and its demand is increasing considerably. There stands an imperative need for the setting up of power plant based on bagasse, which is a waste product from sugar industries. Co-generation is the simultaneous production of process heat and electric power using single fuel. Biomass fuel can also be used in co-generation plants for enhancing their efficiency. Co-generation facilities increase economic viability and profitability of an industry. In sugarcane industries it is most popular environment friendly way of producing electricity using sugarcane bagasse. Co-generation projects based on agro waste like rice husk, bagasse etc. as fuel result is lowering the cost of energy generation, low capital investment, higher profitability of plant. It is a lucrative project with very bright future prospects. A new entrepreneur can venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 15 M W Plant & machinery: 850 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 1746 Lakhs
Return: 53.00%Break even: 46.00%
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Transmission Tower & Tele Communication Tower with Galvanizing Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study

The purpose of a transmission line tower is to support conductors carrying electrical power and one or two ground wires at suitable distances above the ground level and from each other. A transmission line tower is a space-frame and high order indeterminate structure. Its cost is influenced by its weight. Reliability of a transmission structure depends not only upon its design, but also on the development of structural arrangement, detailing of connections, uniformity of quality of structural sections, accurate fabrication, erection in the field and ultimately maintenance. Transmission lines are subjected to various loads during their lifetime. These loads are classified into climatic loads, failure containment loads and construction and maintenance loads. Proper fabrication while maintaining permissible tolerance, galvanizing and testing of towers are very essential. An economical foundation design and proper erection techniques are also very vital for the safety of the tower. The demand is growing for mobile telephony towers. There is an increasing demand for telecom towers in rural/semi-urban areas as the penetration is still very low. The demand for telecom towers is also a function of steadily growing subscriber base and higher usage time of subscribers. India would have an estimated 42.5 crore mobile subscribers by 2010, creating a demand for 4.5 lakh base transmission stations, with major demand coming from rural areas. There is a good scope for new entrants.
Plant capacity: 24,000 MT /YearPlant & machinery: 149 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 716 Lakhs
Return: 46.00%Break even: 53.00%
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Solar Power Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Direct conversion of daylight into electricity by photovoltaic or solar-thermal conversion system is the most promising renewable energy options that have emerged in the recent years. The earth receiver about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world through out the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydroelectric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy. So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydro-electric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy! So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. India's power sector has a total installed capacity of approximately 102,000 MW of which 60% is coal-based, 25% hydro, and the balance gas and nuclear-based. Power shortages are estimated at about 11% of total energy and 15% of peak capacity requirements and are likely to increase in the coming years. In the next 10 years, another 10,000 MW of capacity is required. The bulk of capacity additions involve coal thermal stations supplemented by hydroelectric plant development. Coal-based power involve environmental concerns relating to emissions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, methane and other gases. On the other hand, large hydro plants can lead to soil degradation and erosion, loss of forests, wildlife habitat and species diversity and most importantly, the displacement of people. To promote environmentally sound energy investments as well as help mitigate the acute shortfall in power supply, the Government of India is promoting the accelerated development of the country's renewable energy resources and has made it a priority thrust area under India's National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP). The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). Throughout the 1990's, India's private sector interest in renewable energy increased due to several factors: (i) India opened the power sector to private sector participation in 1991; (ii) tax incentives are now offered to developers of renewable energy systems; (iii) there has been a heightened awareness of the environmental benefits of renewable energy relative to conventional forms and of the short-gestation period for developing alternate energy schemes. Recognizing the opportunities afforded by private sector participation, the Indian Government revised its priorities in July 1993 by giving greater emphasis on promoting renewable energy technologies for power generation. To date, over 1,500 MW of windfarm capacity has been commissioned and about 1,423 MW capacity of small hydro installed. India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. The main objectives of the project are these: (i) To demonstrate the operational viability of parabolic trough solar thermal power generation in India; (ii) support solar power technology development to help lead to a reduction in production cost; and (iii) help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) global emissions in the longer term. Specifically, operational viability will be demonstrated through operation of a solar thermal plant with commercial power sales and delivery arrangements with the grid. Technology development would be supported through technical assistance and training. The project would be pursued under The World Bank's Global Environment Fund (GEF) -- which has a leading program objective focused on climate change. This project is envisaged as the first step of a long term program for promoting solar thermal power in India that would lead to a phased deployment of similar systems in the country and possibly in other developing nations. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry. One of the prime objectives of the demonstration project is to ensure capacity build-up through 'hands on' experience in the design, operation and management of such projects under actual field conditions. Involvement in the project of various players in the energy sector, such as local industries, the private construction and operations contractors, Rajasthan State Power Corporation Limited (RSPCL), Rajasthan State Electricity Board (RSEB), Rajasthan Energy Development Agency (REDA), Central Electricity Authority (CEA), MNES and others, will help to increase the capacity and capability of local technical expertise and further sustain the development of solar power in India in the longer term.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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GOOD OPPORTUNITY IN SOLAR POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

In case of Photovoltaic or direct conversion of sunlight to electricity via solar cell, the efficiencies limited to about 20 percent of the absorbed sunlight. Solar thermal conversion involves the production of shaft power and of electricity via a thermodynamic cycle. In this cycle, a heat engine is driven by energy absorbed from sunlight. The heat engine is the principal feature that distinguishes the discipline of solar-thermal electricity from photovoltaic or home heating and cooling. All heat engines are limited in performance by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. To achieve the higher temperature associated with heat engine efficiency places special requirement on the solar collector used. The collector must be designed either to suppress normal loses that is, those due to radiation, convection or conduction-or to enhance the intensity of the incident solar energy by optical concentration. Finally, to provide a useful quantity of energy at a central location, some degree of power concentration is often required. Solar thermal systems for generating electricity use tracking mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight on to a receiver, where it is converted to high temperature thermal energy. The high-temperature heat in the receiver is then used to drive a heat engine and electric generator to produce electricity. Currently, three architectures for Solar Thermal Systems show promise for generating; parabolic troughs, central receivers, and parabolic dishes. In parabolic trough systems, sunlight is focused on to a receiver tube that runs along the focal line of the collector. Through collectors typically track the sun in one axis. A central receiver system uses a field of heliostats, or sun-tracking mirrors, to focus sunlight on to a tower-mounted receiver. And in a parabolic dish system, both the parabolic mirror and receiver track the sun. Many system configurations are possible. However, the architectures and optical characteristics of solar thermal systems influence the choice of receiver, power conversion equipment, and scale of systems. In typical trough systems, the relatively low concentration ratios (typically 20X - 100X), as well as the inherent economics of scale of steam-Rankine power conversion equipment have led to a large-scale power plants which use a heat transfer oil to collect solar heat in the receiver tube. Central receivers because of higher concentration ratios, typically a few hundred times, and the centrally located receiver have evolved towards molten-salt systems with thermal storage capabilities. Steam-Rankine central receiver systems are also cost effective at large scales, Dish-engine systems, in which the concentrator and receiver track the sun, achieve concentration ratios over 1000 X, and require small eternally heated power converters that are efficient and low cost. Sterling engines located at the focus of the dish have shown the most promise for producing competitively priced electric. The use of hundreds of modular dish-sterling systems at an installation, similar to wind farms that are being considered for utility applications. The earth receives about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world throughout the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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Solar Cell - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue, Plant Economics

Solar cell comprises by two words. Solar means sunlight & cell is the device to provide the current supply and as the whole solar cell is device, which converts light/solar energy into electric energy. Market of solar cell show that solar cell is largely used in small scale units having power requirement about some hundred killo-watts in rural, remote & un approachable areas having no normal power supply. The biggest advantage of solar cell is it does not require any maintenance cost & more economic to use. Kerala State Electronics Development Corporation Ltd has proposed to manufacture solar cell for TV in coming 3 to 4 years. In Africa cost per television programme (new) higher with solar cells come out about US$0.12 as against US$ 0.96 with chemical batteries. The demand for solar cell will definitely increase from use in calculators, wrist watches and other consumer items.
Plant capacity: 10000 Nos. / DayPlant & machinery: 49 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 358 Lakhs
Return: 45.00%Break even: 39.00%
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Water Park - Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue, Plant Economics, Working Capital Requirement, Plant Layout, Cost of Project, Profitability Ratios

In ancient India, there was large use of water in the Tapovana, and different Ashrams in the forests. Elephanta caves in the Maharashtra can be considered as water park. Now the water park is the good idea of amusement. It is very good assets created by human being to enjoy the natural scenery artificially, if situated near by forest or hilly area. Water Park is the generic term for a collection of water rides and other entertainment attractions assembled for the purpose of entertaining a large group of people. A water park is more elaborate than a simple city park or playground, usually providing attractions meant to cater to adults, teenagers, and small children. A theme water park is a type of amusement park which has been built around one or more themes, such as an American West theme, or Atlantis. Today, the terms water parks and theme parks are often used interchangeably. Amusement water parks generally feature a few water rides, such as the log flume, bumper boats, and rowing boats. Such rides are usually gentler and shorter than roller coasters and many are suitable for all ages. Water rides are especially popular on hot days.
Plant capacity: 1000 visitors / DayPlant & machinery: 84 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 362 Lakhs
Return: 41.00%Break even: 38.00%
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GOOD OPPORTUNITIES IN CEMENT PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Plant Layout

The term cement is used to designate many different kinds of substances that are used as binders. The term cements as used henceforth will be confined to inorganic hydraulic cements, principally Portland cement. The demand for the cement was stimulated by the growth of canal systems in the United States during 19th century. This led to process improvements in the calcinations of certain limestones for the manufacture of natural cements and to its gradual displacement by Portland cement. The latter was named by aspdin in a 1924 patent because of its resemblance to a natural limestone quarried on the island of Portland in England. Research conducted in many parts of the world since that time has provided a clear picture of the composition, properties and fields of stability of the principal systems found in Portland cement. These results led to the widely used Bogue calculation of composition based on oxide analysis. Recent research is reported in the International Symposia on the Chemistry of Cements, and the annual reviews, beginning in 1974, of the American Ceramic Society in Cements Research Progress. India is the second-largest producer of cement in the world after China. The cement industry is regional in nature due to the concentration of limestone reserves located in a few states. This has resulted in a surplus situation in some regions and a deficit in others. Demand for cement has grown at a CAGR of 9.1% in the last two years with supply growing at a CAGR of 8.2% in the same period. With a large amount of infrastructure activities being planned in commercial, real estate and housing sector along with huge development works in roads, railways, ports and hydel projects, we expect the cement demand growth momentum to stay intact. We expect this to have a positive impact on cement prices in different regions till new capacities come up by mid-FY09. Demand for cement is correlated to the GDP growth of the country, infrastructure and industrial capex as well as exports. Strong GDP growth expected in the coming years and huge planned investments should result in healthy growth in the cement demand. The Indian economy continues to be on a much stronger growth path driven by increased amount of infrastructure spending and capex. The economy is expected to grow by 8% for the next two to three years, which will drive an increased demand growth for the cement industry. The cement demand is expected to grow at a CAGR of 10% at least for the next three years. The cement industry witnessed serious M&A activity in the past few years, as a result of which the top four players now account for almost 52-55% of the installed cement capacity of India. The M & A activity have also had global participants. The growing presence of international players bring with them better technology and operational efficiencies which could significantly alter pricing patterns. The demand- supply deficit is expected to remain for short term due to strong industrial growth thus keeping the prices firm. Being a bulk commodity, it is unviable to transport cement beyond a certain distance and due to the requirements of proximity to raw materials, proximity to markets, export potential and high freight rates involved it becomes necessary to evaluate the sector on a regional basis. The industry is divided into five regions - north, south, east, west and central. Northern region is facing an acute supply crunch for the last four years due to region's demand-supply deficit and increased net exports to other regions. Cement demand in the region grew at a CAGR of 10% for the last five years and is expected to grow at the same pace for the next five years, backed by aggressive infrastructure development activities, significant hydel capacity addition in the region, surging housing demand, SEZs construction, etc. Cement demand in the Western region has grown at a CAGR of 5.8% for last five years, backed by consistent infrastructure spending, concentrated investment from region-specific industries like oil refineries in Vadodara and Jamnagar region of Gujarat and steady growth in housing activities. The demand will continue to grow at the same pace for next 3-5 years fuelled by enhanced infrastructure spending like construction of the Metro Railway in Mumbai, express highways joining Gujarat and Mumbai, etc., resurgence in industrial investments, strong growth in retail sector. The demand in the southern region has grown at CAGR of 10.2% for the last five years as compared to capacity addition growth of 6.5% for the same period, reflecting the low capacity addition in the region since FY02. The region's demand is expected to grow in the range of 8-9% for the next five years on account of strong capital expenditure in the IT and electronic hardware sector, enhanced spending on infrastructure development, special thrust on irrigation activities, etc. Demand in the Central region grew at CAGR of 5% as compared to All-India demand growth of 8.5% Capacity utilization in the region will continue to remain above 99% for next two years and the region carries the lowest risk among all the regions as the trend would continue even in FY09E. The region is witnessing frenzied investments to the tune of $140bn to be implemented in next 5-10 years. The Eastern region lacks infrastructure to aid this quantum of investment, hence it will fuel the emergence of aggressive infrastructure development. Prices are expected to remain strong on the back of diminishing surplus and tight consolidation present in the region, with 73% of the market being controlled by top five players (three on group-wise criteria, ACC+Gujarat Ambuja, Ultratech+ Grasim and Lafarge). Volatility in cement prices in the Eastern region has been least among all the regions.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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COMPRESSED BIOGAS - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

The term biogases refer to gases created by the anaerobic fermentation of biological materials. Their main constituents are methane and carbon dioxide. Considerable quantities of biogases are produced by anaerobic fermentation of agricultural and organic waste (biogas), sludge digestion in the tanks of sewage treatment plants (sewage gas) and organic residues in garbage tips (land fill gas). Biogas can be utilized for electricity production, cooking, space heating and process heating. If compressed, it can replace compressed natural gas for use in vehicles, where it can fuel cell. Compressed bio-gas is becoming widely used in Sweden, Switzerland and Germany. A bio-gas powered train has been in service in Sweden. In India also compressed biogas is used in bus and car to save environment from pollution. The demand of compressed bio-gas is increasing very rapidly, so there is wide scope for new entrepreneurs to venture into this project.
Plant capacity: 1200 MT/AnnumPlant & machinery: 204 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 447 Lakhs
Return: 43.00%Break even: 33.00%
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THREE STAR HOTEL - Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue, Plant Economics, Working Capital Requirement, Plant Layout, Cost of Project

India offers myriad exciting experiences to tourists. The country boasts of the world's highest mountains, miles of coastline with excellent beaches, tropical forests and wildlife, lagoon backwaters, ancient monuments and World Heritage sites, forts and palaces, and of course, the Taj Mahal. The Indian tourism and hospitality industry has thus emerged as one of the key sectors driving the country's growth and is thriving, owing to a huge surge in both business and leisure travel by foreign and domestic tourists. India have supply of 110,000 rooms. According to the tourism ministry, 4.4 million tourists visited India last year and at current trend, demand will soar to 10 million in 2010 – to accommodate 350 million domestic travelers. India has a shortage of 150,000 rooms fueling hotel room rates across India. According to the World Travel and Trade Council, demand in tourism in India will continue to grow at a rapid pace. It estimates the demand to grow at an average of 8.8 per cent between 2004 and 2013, making India the world's third fastest-growing tourist market. The boom in the Indian tourism industry has percolated to the rural areas as well. India continues to attract tourists owing to its splendid historical architecture and rich culture along with beautiful beaches and rural tourism. With India being on the global tourist map and an increasing number of people coming to India for tourism or business, Indian hotel industry is looking at expansion in a major way.
Plant capacity: Single Room - 30 Nos. Double Room - 40 Nos. Suites - 10 Nos. Banquet Hall - 1 Number Plant & machinery: 327 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 1500 Lakhs
Return: 48.00%Break even: 37.00%
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Information
  • One Lac / Lakh / Lakhs is equivalent to one hundred thousand (100,000)
  • One Crore is equivalent to ten million (10,000,000)
  • T.C.I is Total Capital Investment
  • We can modify the project capacity and project cost as per your requirement.
  • We can also prepare project report on any subject as per your requirement.
  • Caution: The project's cost, capacity and return are subject to change without any notice. Future projects may have different values of project cost, capacity or return.

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About NIIR PROJECT CONSULTANCY SERVICES

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NIIR PROJECT CONSULTANCY SERVICES (NPCS) is a reliable name in the industrial world for offering integrated technical consultancy services. NPCS is manned by engineers, planners, specialists, financial experts, economic analysts and design specialists with extensive experience in the related industries.

Our various services are: Detailed Project Report, Business Plan for Manufacturing Plant, Start-up Ideas, Business Ideas for Entrepreneurs, Start up Business Opportunities, entrepreneurship projects, Successful Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, project report, Cost and Revenue, Pre-feasibility study for Profitable Manufacturing Business, Project Identification, Project Feasibility and Market Study, Identification of Profitable Industrial Project Opportunities, Business Opportunities, Investment Opportunities for Most Profitable Business in India, Manufacturing Business Ideas, Preparation of Project Profile, Pre-Investment and Pre-Feasibility Study, Market Research Study, Preparation of Techno-Economic Feasibility Report, Identification and Selection of Plant, Process, Equipment, General Guidance, Startup Help, Technical and Commercial Counseling for setting up new industrial project and Most Profitable Small Scale Business.

NPCS also publishes varies process technology, technical, reference, self employment and startup books, directory, business and industry database, bankable detailed project report, market research report on various industries, small scale industry and profit making business. Besides being used by manufacturers, industrialists and entrepreneurs, our publications are also used by professionals including project engineers, information services bureau, consultants and project consultancy firms as one of the input in their research.

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