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Renewable Energy Sector, Green Power, Solar Energy, Biofuel, Hydroelectric, Wind, Geothermal, Biomass, Non-conventional Energy, New and Renewable Energy Projects

India is said to be one of the seven largest consumers of energy, but the growing gap between consumption and domestic output is a cause of concern. India’s share in global oil reserves is about 0.5 per cent, whereas its share in global consumption is about 3 per cent. India is still dependent to the extent of 30 to 35 per cent on non-commercial fuel sources like cowdung, firewood, agricultural waste, etc. The growing energy needs of the emerging economics, specifically India, risks enhanced environmental demage from conventional carbon based sources of energy. The pressure on petrol is mounting and we have to concentrate on conservation of petroleum. Towards conservation of petroleum consumption, the government has to ration supplies of cooking gas, kerosene and petrol; improve power generation; focus on alternative source of energy such as solar, wind and bio-fuels; setup energy standards for all vehicles and a mass awareness for conservation. As the country’s petroleum bill grows, and future supplies look volatile or insecure, alternatives need to be explored. Ethanol is an environment-friendly oxidant additive to gasoline. There is a growing interest in biodiesel or ethanol blend. Energy majors are determined to tap biofuels. Special attention is being paid to jatropha cultivation. The corporate sector too is focusing on the biofuels sector. It is estimated that globally about one million hectares would cater to biofuels over the next four years, with an estimated 300,000 hectares contributing each year to biofuels in South East Asia, India and Southern African countries. India will itself produce 2 million tones of biodiesel by 2012.

Power and Energy sector is in a positive mood and is leaving no missed opportunity to make hay of it, while the sun shines. India has set up a target of 20000 MW of installed capacity by 2022 for harnessing solar energy. It is leaving no stone unturned to become a solar hub in the world. With such earnest efforts, India’s mission to tap solar energy is not a pipe dream.

Renewable Energy technologies like solar, biomass, hydro, etc are deployed both in rural and urban areas to curb the growing gap between the demand and supply of power, which is due to increase in the per capita energy consumption and importantly, the much hyped climate change concerns. At 10464 MW, India presently ranks fifth in the world in wind power generations. The future of solar photovoltaic development in India seems to be very bright. India’s solar mission envisages the promotion of solar energy to harness and distribute environment-friendly power, available with high scalability, for sustainable economic growth by empowering national energy security.

Indian clean development mechanism projects broadly cover a range of sectors viz power generation from renewable energy, particularly wind and hydro power, biomass applications, waste heat and energy recycling. Accelerated growth is expected in renewable energy sector, particularly wind energy sector, solar energy sector, biofuels sector .etc with favourable conditions in terms of potential, technical support facilities, policy framework and regulatory environment, robust manufacturing base, and investors confidence in the country.

 

 

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CO-GENERATION POWER PLANT BASED ON BAGASSE - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

Co-generation plant based on Bagasse is the need of the hour in the perspective of the power generation required and its demand is increasing considerably. There stands an imperative need for the setting up of power plant based on bagasse, which is a waste product from sugar industries. Co-generation is the simultaneous production of process heat and electric power using single fuel. Biomass fuel can also be used in co-generation plants for enhancing their efficiency. Co-generation facilities increase economic viability and profitability of an industry. In sugarcane industries it is most popular environment friendly way of producing electricity using sugarcane bagasse. Co-generation projects based on agro waste like rice husk, bagasse etc. as fuel result is lowering the cost of energy generation, low capital investment, higher profitability of plant. It is a lucrative project with very bright future prospects. A new entrepreneur can venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 15 M W Plant & machinery: 850 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 1746 Lakhs
Return: 53.00%Break even: 46.00%
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Solar Power Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Direct conversion of daylight into electricity by photovoltaic or solar-thermal conversion system is the most promising renewable energy options that have emerged in the recent years. The earth receiver about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world through out the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydroelectric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy. So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydro-electric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy! So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. India's power sector has a total installed capacity of approximately 102,000 MW of which 60% is coal-based, 25% hydro, and the balance gas and nuclear-based. Power shortages are estimated at about 11% of total energy and 15% of peak capacity requirements and are likely to increase in the coming years. In the next 10 years, another 10,000 MW of capacity is required. The bulk of capacity additions involve coal thermal stations supplemented by hydroelectric plant development. Coal-based power involve environmental concerns relating to emissions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, methane and other gases. On the other hand, large hydro plants can lead to soil degradation and erosion, loss of forests, wildlife habitat and species diversity and most importantly, the displacement of people. To promote environmentally sound energy investments as well as help mitigate the acute shortfall in power supply, the Government of India is promoting the accelerated development of the country's renewable energy resources and has made it a priority thrust area under India's National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP). The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). Throughout the 1990's, India's private sector interest in renewable energy increased due to several factors: (i) India opened the power sector to private sector participation in 1991; (ii) tax incentives are now offered to developers of renewable energy systems; (iii) there has been a heightened awareness of the environmental benefits of renewable energy relative to conventional forms and of the short-gestation period for developing alternate energy schemes. Recognizing the opportunities afforded by private sector participation, the Indian Government revised its priorities in July 1993 by giving greater emphasis on promoting renewable energy technologies for power generation. To date, over 1,500 MW of windfarm capacity has been commissioned and about 1,423 MW capacity of small hydro installed. India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. The main objectives of the project are these: (i) To demonstrate the operational viability of parabolic trough solar thermal power generation in India; (ii) support solar power technology development to help lead to a reduction in production cost; and (iii) help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) global emissions in the longer term. Specifically, operational viability will be demonstrated through operation of a solar thermal plant with commercial power sales and delivery arrangements with the grid. Technology development would be supported through technical assistance and training. The project would be pursued under The World Bank's Global Environment Fund (GEF) -- which has a leading program objective focused on climate change. This project is envisaged as the first step of a long term program for promoting solar thermal power in India that would lead to a phased deployment of similar systems in the country and possibly in other developing nations. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry. One of the prime objectives of the demonstration project is to ensure capacity build-up through 'hands on' experience in the design, operation and management of such projects under actual field conditions. Involvement in the project of various players in the energy sector, such as local industries, the private construction and operations contractors, Rajasthan State Power Corporation Limited (RSPCL), Rajasthan State Electricity Board (RSEB), Rajasthan Energy Development Agency (REDA), Central Electricity Authority (CEA), MNES and others, will help to increase the capacity and capability of local technical expertise and further sustain the development of solar power in India in the longer term.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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DAIRY FARMING WITH POWER PLANT BASED ON DUNG - Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

The importance of milk in human diet especially for children and expectant and nursing matters is vital. To meet the demand of the increasing population milk production in India has to be increased upto about 70 million tonnes by 2008 AD. More than 60% of the families involved in dairying belong to the small or marginal farmers or even agricultural labourers. The term power plant is often used loosely to designate any plant in which steam is generated regardless of whether power is produced. Power generated by cow dung makes the project more viable. Milk and milk products play a vital role in the countrys agricultural economy. The milk production is expected to surge forward in the coming years. The annual milk production has more than doubled in the last two decades. As much 90% of this production comes from only 12 states. New comers may successfully venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 27000 Kgs. Milk / Day, 5 MW Power Plant Based on Cow Dung Plant & machinery: 4 Crores
Working capital: -T.C.I: 25 Crores
Return: 43.00%Break even: 32.00%
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GOOD OPPORTUNITY IN SOLAR POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

In case of Photovoltaic or direct conversion of sunlight to electricity via solar cell, the efficiencies limited to about 20 percent of the absorbed sunlight. Solar thermal conversion involves the production of shaft power and of electricity via a thermodynamic cycle. In this cycle, a heat engine is driven by energy absorbed from sunlight. The heat engine is the principal feature that distinguishes the discipline of solar-thermal electricity from photovoltaic or home heating and cooling. All heat engines are limited in performance by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. To achieve the higher temperature associated with heat engine efficiency places special requirement on the solar collector used. The collector must be designed either to suppress normal loses that is, those due to radiation, convection or conduction-or to enhance the intensity of the incident solar energy by optical concentration. Finally, to provide a useful quantity of energy at a central location, some degree of power concentration is often required. Solar thermal systems for generating electricity use tracking mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight on to a receiver, where it is converted to high temperature thermal energy. The high-temperature heat in the receiver is then used to drive a heat engine and electric generator to produce electricity. Currently, three architectures for Solar Thermal Systems show promise for generating; parabolic troughs, central receivers, and parabolic dishes. In parabolic trough systems, sunlight is focused on to a receiver tube that runs along the focal line of the collector. Through collectors typically track the sun in one axis. A central receiver system uses a field of heliostats, or sun-tracking mirrors, to focus sunlight on to a tower-mounted receiver. And in a parabolic dish system, both the parabolic mirror and receiver track the sun. Many system configurations are possible. However, the architectures and optical characteristics of solar thermal systems influence the choice of receiver, power conversion equipment, and scale of systems. In typical trough systems, the relatively low concentration ratios (typically 20X - 100X), as well as the inherent economics of scale of steam-Rankine power conversion equipment have led to a large-scale power plants which use a heat transfer oil to collect solar heat in the receiver tube. Central receivers because of higher concentration ratios, typically a few hundred times, and the centrally located receiver have evolved towards molten-salt systems with thermal storage capabilities. Steam-Rankine central receiver systems are also cost effective at large scales, Dish-engine systems, in which the concentrator and receiver track the sun, achieve concentration ratios over 1000 X, and require small eternally heated power converters that are efficient and low cost. Sterling engines located at the focus of the dish have shown the most promise for producing competitively priced electric. The use of hundreds of modular dish-sterling systems at an installation, similar to wind farms that are being considered for utility applications. The earth receives about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world throughout the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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Solar Cell - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue, Plant Economics

Solar cell comprises by two words. Solar means sunlight & cell is the device to provide the current supply and as the whole solar cell is device, which converts light/solar energy into electric energy. Market of solar cell show that solar cell is largely used in small scale units having power requirement about some hundred killo-watts in rural, remote & un approachable areas having no normal power supply. The biggest advantage of solar cell is it does not require any maintenance cost & more economic to use. Kerala State Electronics Development Corporation Ltd has proposed to manufacture solar cell for TV in coming 3 to 4 years. In Africa cost per television programme (new) higher with solar cells come out about US$0.12 as against US$ 0.96 with chemical batteries. The demand for solar cell will definitely increase from use in calculators, wrist watches and other consumer items.
Plant capacity: 10000 Nos. / DayPlant & machinery: 49 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 358 Lakhs
Return: 45.00%Break even: 39.00%
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COMPRESSED BIOGAS - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

The term biogases refer to gases created by the anaerobic fermentation of biological materials. Their main constituents are methane and carbon dioxide. Considerable quantities of biogases are produced by anaerobic fermentation of agricultural and organic waste (biogas), sludge digestion in the tanks of sewage treatment plants (sewage gas) and organic residues in garbage tips (land fill gas). Biogas can be utilized for electricity production, cooking, space heating and process heating. If compressed, it can replace compressed natural gas for use in vehicles, where it can fuel cell. Compressed bio-gas is becoming widely used in Sweden, Switzerland and Germany. A bio-gas powered train has been in service in Sweden. In India also compressed biogas is used in bus and car to save environment from pollution. The demand of compressed bio-gas is increasing very rapidly, so there is wide scope for new entrepreneurs to venture into this project.
Plant capacity: 1200 MT/AnnumPlant & machinery: 204 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 447 Lakhs
Return: 43.00%Break even: 33.00%
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Dairy Farming , Milk Products With Cow Urine Processing and Biogas Plant - Cattle Breeding Farm, Fodder, Livestock Farming, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Cost and Revenue

DAIRY FARMING AND MILK PRODUCTS (Ghee, Pasturised Milk in Poly Pack), Cow Urine Processing and Packing in ½ Ltr. Glass Bottles with Biogas Plant Dairy farming is class of agricultural or an animal husbandry, enterprise, for long terms production of milk, which may be either processed on site or transported to a dairy factory for processing and eventual retail sale. Dairying plays a dynamic role in Indias agro based economy. Milk production alone involves more than 70 million producers, each raising one or two cows/buffaloes primarily for milk production. The dairy involves processing raw milk into products such as consumer milk, butter, ghee, cheese, yogurt, condensed milk, skimmed milk powder and ice cream etc. Biogas production is one of the best methods for waste disposal and utilization and extensively exploited in India. Cattle dung and other organic matters are the best source for producing biogas. Cow urine or goumutra is considered sacred in Hindu mythology. It is used for various purposes for its medicinal values. The cow urine can cure anything from skin diseases, kidney and liver ailments to obesity and heart ailments. Having all the facts in mind it can be predicted that dairy farming with processing unit and biogas plant is very lucrative for new entrants. Cost Estimation: Capacity : Buffalo Milk 7230 Kls/Annum Cow Milk 720 Kls/Annum Skimmed Milk 324 Kls/Annum Ghee 18000 Kg/Annum Processed Cow Urine 4380000 Bottle No./Annum Bio Gas 31000 Kg/Annum
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: 162 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: 1665 Lakhs
Return: 47.00%Break even: 32.00%
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SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC (PV) MODULES ASSEMBLING PLANT (10 MW) - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Plant Layout

Photovoltaic (PV) is the field of technology and research related to the application of solar cells for energy by converting sun energy (sunlight, including sun ultra violet radiation) directly into electricity. Due to the growing demand for clean sources of energy, the manufacture of solar cells and photovoltaic arrays has expanded dramatically in recent years. Photovoltaic production has been doubling every 2 years, increasing by an average of 48 percent each year since 2002, making it the worlds fastest-growing energy technology. At the end of 2008, the cumulative global PV installations reached 15,200 megawatts. Roughly 90% of this generating capacity consists of grid-tied electrical systems. Such installations may be ground-mounted (and sometimes integrated with farming and grazing) or built into the roof or walls of a building, known as Building Integrated Photovoltaics or BIPV for short Solar energy is energy transmitted from the sun. But they differ in the ways they capture and use solar energy to produce heat or electricity. Solar electric power systems transform sunlight into electricity. Every minute the sun baths the earth in as much energy as the world consumes in an entire year. An alternative technology consists of concentration solar power (CSP), where the suns energy is at first concentrated by reflective devices such as troughs or mirror panels and then the resulting concentrated heat energy is transferred to a heat-transfer medium, which is used to power a conventional turbine and produce electricity. At present the small size of the plants and the pure solar design for most of them required the existence of public economic support through investment subsidies and a special tariff for the electricity produced.
Plant capacity: 1 No./AnnumPlant & machinery: 1241 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 1778 Lakhs
Return: 60.00%Break even: 60.00%
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Captive Power Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Robust power generation and an effective delivery model determine the bullish economic growth of a country. A weak power infrastructure impedes the growth potential and pulls back the growth initiatives. Indias per capita power consumption was 490 units (Kwh) in 2004-05, one third compared with 1,500 units of China. Indias consumption stood at about 644 units in 2007-08 at an annual average growth of 10.47%. However, during the same period, Chinas consumption had grown at 12 to 13% per annum. The National Electricity Policy envisages Power for all by 2012 and the per capita availability of power to be increased to over 1,000 units, which indicates an average consumption growth of about 13.81% every year. It is easy to make such exciting projections, but very difficult to attain it, especially when the capacity addition targets of every five-year plan fall short of expectations. In this scenario, there is a need for increased private participation in the power sector to make India self-reliant in power. This Pre-feasibility Report on Captive Power (5MW) provides information on the overall power scenario in the country, sectoral segmentation and structure of the industry, demand and supply of power, captive power scenario in India, need for captive power, growth drivers, steps involved in setting up a captive power plant, capital outlay, profitability and balance sheet analysis. The details include requirement of plant and machinery, tentative cost of project, project financing, revenue and profitability projection, IRR, important financial ratios and breakeven point of the project. Over the last decade and half, India Inc has established itself as a vibrant economy with growing domestic consumption coupled with huge export potential. Stable political environment, dependable democratic fabric of the country, strong legal system, huge talent pool and cost advantage have made India a reliable business partner of the global community, attracting good foreign investment. While the growth trend is set off, there is tremendous need for building the background infrastructural support system to sustain the trend. Power being one of the most crucial needs for industrial growth finds its priority and as a result the National Electricity Policy rightly envisages Power for all by 2012. To attain this target, a total capacity addition of about 100,000MW was projected for 10th and 11th plan period. Although there has been some hectic activity in capacity addition, the possibility of attaining the target looks remote. This increases the responsibility of each industry so as to become self-reliant in power, not only to ensure reduced operational expenses but also to contribute towards making the country self-sufficient in power. Captive Power refers to generation from a unit set up by industry for its exclusive consumption. The estimates on captive power capacity in the country vary with the Central Electricity Authority putting the figure at about 11600 MW while industry experts feel that it is much higher, close to 20000 MW. Industrial sector is one of the largest consumers of electrical energy in India. However, a number of industries are now increasingly relying on their own generation (captive and co generation) rather than on grid supply, primarily for the following reasons: Non-availability of adequate grid supply Poor quality and reliability of grid supply High tariff as a result of heavy cross- subsidization The State Governments and SEBs have been concerned about the growing importance of Captive Power Plants account of the following reasons: Captive plants may have adverse impacts on the finances of the utility, such as: Industrial load is the main source for cross-subsidizing revenue flows , Billing and collection is much more efficient for HT consumers, SEBs ability to service escrow accounts for security packages is also reduced, Non-optimal growth of the sector Problems in grid management especially in case of states with surplus power Adverse environmental impacts arising from types of fuels used and from higher emissions per unit of production, as compared to large power plants. Reliability of power supply from captive and cogen plants as a source of firm power while on the other hand the concern of the owners of captive and cogen plants stems from: Non-remunerative tariff structure for surplus power produced by them No risk sharing in case of non availability of fuel, change in variable cost due to switching of fuel after entering into power purchase agreement (PPA), etc Inadequacies in wheeling and banking facilities High contract demand charges. High level of duties and taxes on sale of power High wheeling losses assumed for power to be sold to grid by captive or cogen plant Need to devote time and energy to an activity, which is not their core business Restrictions on the minimum amount of power to be wheeled If the captive power plant (CPP) fails, charges for back-up or stand by power from the grid are twice the normal rate for captive plants No formal policy for purchase of co generated power (in most of the states)
Plant capacity: 5 MWPlant & machinery: 1733 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 2097 Lakhs
Return: 33.00%Break even: 34.00%
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SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS-A VIABLE FUTURE ALTERNATIVE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study

Solar energy is an enormous resource that is readily available in all countries throughout the world, and all the space above the earth. It can be used everywhere, and can, in principal, satisfy most of India’s energy demand from a renewable, safe and clean resources. Most of all, it reduces the impact of energy production and consumption. With a population of 683 million, living in an area of about 3.28 million sq km, India has one of the lowest energy consumption per capita in the world; the equivalent of about 315 kg of coal per annum. Approximately 40% of this energy comes from non-commercial sources such as firewood, animal dung, agricultural waste etc. The electrical energy consumption per capita is only about 172KWh compared with a world average of 1700 KWh. The recent energy crisis has predictably resulted in a search for economically viable renewable energy sources suitable for large-scale utilization. India should accelerate the use of all forms of renewable energy (photovoltaic, thermal solar, solar lamps, solar pumps, wind power, biomass, biogas, and hydro), and more proactively promote energy efficiency. India must accelerate its investment in renewable energy resources, specifically solar and wind energy. The technological maturity achieved has naturally guided the Indian planners seriously to consider solar photovoltaic energy sources, among others, as viable future alternatives. The current levels of dependence on fossil fuels, the need of reducing the carbon emissions associated with energy use and the prospects of developing a new and extremely innovative technology sector, make photovoltaics increasingly attractive. Photovoltaics are devices which directly convert sunlight into electricity. The solar cell is the elementary building block of the photovoltaic technology. Solar cells are made of semiconductor materials, such as silicon. One of the properties of semiconductors that makes them most useful is that their conductivity may easily be modified by introducing impurities into their crystal lattice. Solar photovoltaic energy sources produce D.C. electricity directly from solar energy. A number of solar cells electrically connected to each other and mounted in a single support structure or frame is called a ‘photovoltaic module’. Modules are designed to supply electricity at a certain voltage. The current produced is directly dependent on the intensity of light reaching the module. Several modules can be wired together to form an array. Photovoltaic modules and arrays produce direct-current electricity. They can be connected in both series and parallel electrical arrangements to produce any required voltage and current combination. There are two main types of photovoltaic system. Grid connected systems (on-grid systems) are connected to the grid and inject the electricity into the grid. For this reason, the direct current produced by the solar modules is converted into a grid-compatible alternating current. However, solar power plants can also be operated without the grid and are then called autonomous systems (off-grid systems). More than 90 % of photovoltaic systems worldwide are currently implemented as grid-connected systems. The power conditioning unit also monitors the functioning of the system and the grid and switches off the system in case of faults. Solar photovoltaic energy sources can be deployed either as centralized or as distributed systems. At present, the centralized schemes have little importance in the context of India. Of the three schemes of distributed sources, the community-based and the user-owned stand-alone systems are of importance to India. Although it has been recognized in India that the major impact of solar photovoltaic sources will be in lift irrigation, there are a large number of other potential areas of application where photovoltaic can make an effective contribution. These include diverse areas such as individual home lighting, rural lighting, offshore oil platforms, rural communication system, weather monitoring systems and many more. The National Solar Mission, with an ambitious target of achieving 20,000 MW capacity by 2030 under the national action plan on climate change, will also be in operation this year with the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy's plan budget being increased by 61% from Rs 617 crore to Rs 998 crore. The target: 200 MW grid power and 32 MW equivalent off-grid solar power to be installed in the next financial year. Custom duty has also been pegged at a low 5% on equipment for solar photovoltaic and solar thermal power. These equipments will also be exempted from central excise duties. Excise will also be reduced from 8% to 4% on LED lights. Photovoltaic technology is safe, clean, robust and proven to be efficient and highly scalable. Photovoltaics are easy to introduce and implemented all over the world, in both developed and developing countries. Thus renewable technologies are a clear opportunity for India to establish and reinforce a competitive edge in a highly innovative industrial sector. It is currently in a position to lead the worldwide effort to reduce harmful emissions from energy systems and strengthen its industrial basis, thus also creating new skilled jobs. India should begin creating a mainstream solar energy market with the goal of making solar power cost-competitive with fossil fuel-generated electricity in the near future. India will strongly prioritize the use of solar thermal energy as a solution to the climate and energy crisis. India’s solar energy holds great promise.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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  • One Lac / Lakh / Lakhs is equivalent to one hundred thousand (100,000)
  • One Crore is equivalent to ten million (10,000,000)
  • T.C.I is Total Capital Investment
  • We can modify the project capacity and project cost as per your requirement.
  • We can also prepare project report on any subject as per your requirement.
  • Caution: The project's cost, capacity and return are subject to change without any notice. Future projects may have different values of project cost, capacity or return.

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