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Power, Energy generation, Distribution, Production and related Projects

We can provide you detailed project reports on the following topics. Please select the projects of your interests.

Each detailed project reports cover all the aspects of business, from analysing the market, confirming availability of various necessities such as plant & machinery, raw materials to forecasting the financial requirements. The scope of the report includes assessing market potential, negotiating with collaborators, investment decision making, corporate diversification planning etc. in a very planned manner by formulating detailed manufacturing techniques and forecasting financial aspects by estimating the cost of raw material, formulating the cash flow statement, projecting the balance sheet etc.

We also offer self-contained Pre-Investment and Pre-Feasibility Studies, Market Surveys and Studies, Preparation of Techno-Economic Feasibility Reports, Identification and Selection of Plant and Machinery, Manufacturing Process and or Equipment required, General Guidance, Technical and Commercial Counseling for setting up new industrial projects on the following topics.

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Solar Power Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Solar thermal systems for generating electricity use tracking mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight on to a receiver, where, it is converted to high temperature thermal energy. The high-temperature heat in the receiver is then used to drive a heat engine and electric generator to produce electricity. The solar energy ultimately heats a fluid powering a small engine / generator operating at about 8000C, a single dish module can generate up to 50 KW of electric power. Many dishes can be grouped together to produce more power. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world through out the year. There is a good scope for new entrants.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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Maintenance Free Rechargeable Battery - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

Although the lead acid cell was developed by B. Gaston in 1860, it was not until much later when it was adopted by the automobile industry in term of maintenance free rechargeable battery that is gained popularity. The maintenance free rechargeable battery lead acid type can also be floater nickel charged when it is continuously connected to an electrical system. It is widely used in different fields such as for automobiles air crafts, electric locomotives and multiple units, terminal connectors, motor cycles train lighting air conditioning etc. This is specially used as economically secondary battery. Rechargeable batteries though a very small segment in India have a very high potential for growth. Increased use of equipment such as personal organizers, laptop computers, cellular phones, video cameras and cordless phones is increasing the demand for such batteries at a very rapid rate. To looking its demand we can say that there is a good scope for new entrants.
Plant capacity: 834 Nos./day Plant & machinery: Rs. 65 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Rs. 1179 Lakhs
Return: 52.00%Break even: 30.00%
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Inverters 50Hz 100 to 1000 KVA - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Inverter is a circuit which converts the D.C. input voltage to an A.C. voltage of specified limit. As soon as electrical technology got developed it become very clear and evident that production transmission and utilization of electrical energy is more economic if it is used in form of A.C. voltage than with conventional D.C. voltage. The Indian renewable energy (RE) industry is diversified and offers strong business prospects to U.S companies. The market in India for RE business is estimated at USD 500 million and is growing at an annual rate of 15%. The major areas of investment are: solar energy, wind energy, small hydro projects, waste-to-energy, biomass and alternative fuel. The new entrepreneur can well venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 80 Nos./day Plant & machinery: Rs. 7 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Rs. 1030 Lakhs
Return: 55.00%Break even: 20.00%
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CO-GENERATION POWER PLANT BASED ON BAGASSE - Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue, Plant Economics, Working Capital Requirement, Plant Layout

Co-generation plant based on Bagasse is the need of the hour in the perspective of the power generation required and its demand is increasing considerably. There stands an imperative need for the setting up of power plant based on bagasse, which is a waste product from sugar industries. Co-generation is the simultaneous production of process heat and electric power using single fuel. Biomass fuel can also be used in co-generation plants for enhancing their efficiency. Co-generation facilities increase economic viability and profitability of an industry. In sugarcane industries it is most popular environment friendly way of producing electricity using sugarcane bagasse. Co-generation projects based on agro waste like rice husk, bagasse etc. as fuel result is lowering the cost of energy generation, low capital investment, higher profitability of plant. It is a lucrative project with very bright future prospects. A new entrepreneur can venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 15 MW Plant & machinery: 850 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 1746 Lakhs
Return: 53.00%Break even: 46.00%
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CO-GENERATION POWER PLANT BASED ON BAGASSE - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

Co-generation plant based on Bagasse is the need of the hour in the perspective of the power generation required and its demand is increasing considerably. There stands an imperative need for the setting up of power plant based on bagasse, which is a waste product from sugar industries. Co-generation is the simultaneous production of process heat and electric power using single fuel. Biomass fuel can also be used in co-generation plants for enhancing their efficiency. Co-generation facilities increase economic viability and profitability of an industry. In sugarcane industries it is most popular environment friendly way of producing electricity using sugarcane bagasse. Co-generation projects based on agro waste like rice husk, bagasse etc. as fuel result is lowering the cost of energy generation, low capital investment, higher profitability of plant. It is a lucrative project with very bright future prospects. A new entrepreneur can venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 15 M W Plant & machinery: 850 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 1746 Lakhs
Return: 53.00%Break even: 46.00%
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Transmission Tower & Tele Communication Tower with Galvanizing Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study

The purpose of a transmission line tower is to support conductors carrying electrical power and one or two ground wires at suitable distances above the ground level and from each other. A transmission line tower is a space-frame and high order indeterminate structure. Its cost is influenced by its weight. Reliability of a transmission structure depends not only upon its design, but also on the development of structural arrangement, detailing of connections, uniformity of quality of structural sections, accurate fabrication, erection in the field and ultimately maintenance. Transmission lines are subjected to various loads during their lifetime. These loads are classified into climatic loads, failure containment loads and construction and maintenance loads. Proper fabrication while maintaining permissible tolerance, galvanizing and testing of towers are very essential. An economical foundation design and proper erection techniques are also very vital for the safety of the tower. The demand is growing for mobile telephony towers. There is an increasing demand for telecom towers in rural/semi-urban areas as the penetration is still very low. The demand for telecom towers is also a function of steadily growing subscriber base and higher usage time of subscribers. India would have an estimated 42.5 crore mobile subscribers by 2010, creating a demand for 4.5 lakh base transmission stations, with major demand coming from rural areas. There is a good scope for new entrants.
Plant capacity: 24,000 MT /YearPlant & machinery: 149 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 716 Lakhs
Return: 46.00%Break even: 53.00%
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Solar Power Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Direct conversion of daylight into electricity by photovoltaic or solar-thermal conversion system is the most promising renewable energy options that have emerged in the recent years. The earth receiver about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world through out the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydroelectric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy. So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydro-electric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy! So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. India's power sector has a total installed capacity of approximately 102,000 MW of which 60% is coal-based, 25% hydro, and the balance gas and nuclear-based. Power shortages are estimated at about 11% of total energy and 15% of peak capacity requirements and are likely to increase in the coming years. In the next 10 years, another 10,000 MW of capacity is required. The bulk of capacity additions involve coal thermal stations supplemented by hydroelectric plant development. Coal-based power involve environmental concerns relating to emissions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, methane and other gases. On the other hand, large hydro plants can lead to soil degradation and erosion, loss of forests, wildlife habitat and species diversity and most importantly, the displacement of people. To promote environmentally sound energy investments as well as help mitigate the acute shortfall in power supply, the Government of India is promoting the accelerated development of the country's renewable energy resources and has made it a priority thrust area under India's National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP). The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). Throughout the 1990's, India's private sector interest in renewable energy increased due to several factors: (i) India opened the power sector to private sector participation in 1991; (ii) tax incentives are now offered to developers of renewable energy systems; (iii) there has been a heightened awareness of the environmental benefits of renewable energy relative to conventional forms and of the short-gestation period for developing alternate energy schemes. Recognizing the opportunities afforded by private sector participation, the Indian Government revised its priorities in July 1993 by giving greater emphasis on promoting renewable energy technologies for power generation. To date, over 1,500 MW of windfarm capacity has been commissioned and about 1,423 MW capacity of small hydro installed. India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. The main objectives of the project are these: (i) To demonstrate the operational viability of parabolic trough solar thermal power generation in India; (ii) support solar power technology development to help lead to a reduction in production cost; and (iii) help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) global emissions in the longer term. Specifically, operational viability will be demonstrated through operation of a solar thermal plant with commercial power sales and delivery arrangements with the grid. Technology development would be supported through technical assistance and training. The project would be pursued under The World Bank's Global Environment Fund (GEF) -- which has a leading program objective focused on climate change. This project is envisaged as the first step of a long term program for promoting solar thermal power in India that would lead to a phased deployment of similar systems in the country and possibly in other developing nations. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry. One of the prime objectives of the demonstration project is to ensure capacity build-up through 'hands on' experience in the design, operation and management of such projects under actual field conditions. Involvement in the project of various players in the energy sector, such as local industries, the private construction and operations contractors, Rajasthan State Power Corporation Limited (RSPCL), Rajasthan State Electricity Board (RSEB), Rajasthan Energy Development Agency (REDA), Central Electricity Authority (CEA), MNES and others, will help to increase the capacity and capability of local technical expertise and further sustain the development of solar power in India in the longer term.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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DAIRY FARMING WITH POWER PLANT BASED ON DUNG - Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

The importance of milk in human diet especially for children and expectant and nursing matters is vital. To meet the demand of the increasing population milk production in India has to be increased upto about 70 million tonnes by 2008 AD. More than 60% of the families involved in dairying belong to the small or marginal farmers or even agricultural labourers. The term power plant is often used loosely to designate any plant in which steam is generated regardless of whether power is produced. Power generated by cow dung makes the project more viable. Milk and milk products play a vital role in the countrys agricultural economy. The milk production is expected to surge forward in the coming years. The annual milk production has more than doubled in the last two decades. As much 90% of this production comes from only 12 states. New comers may successfully venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 27000 Kgs. Milk / Day, 5 MW Power Plant Based on Cow Dung Plant & machinery: 4 Crores
Working capital: -T.C.I: 25 Crores
Return: 43.00%Break even: 32.00%
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GOOD OPPORTUNITY IN SOLAR POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

In case of Photovoltaic or direct conversion of sunlight to electricity via solar cell, the efficiencies limited to about 20 percent of the absorbed sunlight. Solar thermal conversion involves the production of shaft power and of electricity via a thermodynamic cycle. In this cycle, a heat engine is driven by energy absorbed from sunlight. The heat engine is the principal feature that distinguishes the discipline of solar-thermal electricity from photovoltaic or home heating and cooling. All heat engines are limited in performance by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. To achieve the higher temperature associated with heat engine efficiency places special requirement on the solar collector used. The collector must be designed either to suppress normal loses that is, those due to radiation, convection or conduction-or to enhance the intensity of the incident solar energy by optical concentration. Finally, to provide a useful quantity of energy at a central location, some degree of power concentration is often required. Solar thermal systems for generating electricity use tracking mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight on to a receiver, where it is converted to high temperature thermal energy. The high-temperature heat in the receiver is then used to drive a heat engine and electric generator to produce electricity. Currently, three architectures for Solar Thermal Systems show promise for generating; parabolic troughs, central receivers, and parabolic dishes. In parabolic trough systems, sunlight is focused on to a receiver tube that runs along the focal line of the collector. Through collectors typically track the sun in one axis. A central receiver system uses a field of heliostats, or sun-tracking mirrors, to focus sunlight on to a tower-mounted receiver. And in a parabolic dish system, both the parabolic mirror and receiver track the sun. Many system configurations are possible. However, the architectures and optical characteristics of solar thermal systems influence the choice of receiver, power conversion equipment, and scale of systems. In typical trough systems, the relatively low concentration ratios (typically 20X - 100X), as well as the inherent economics of scale of steam-Rankine power conversion equipment have led to a large-scale power plants which use a heat transfer oil to collect solar heat in the receiver tube. Central receivers because of higher concentration ratios, typically a few hundred times, and the centrally located receiver have evolved towards molten-salt systems with thermal storage capabilities. Steam-Rankine central receiver systems are also cost effective at large scales, Dish-engine systems, in which the concentrator and receiver track the sun, achieve concentration ratios over 1000 X, and require small eternally heated power converters that are efficient and low cost. Sterling engines located at the focus of the dish have shown the most promise for producing competitively priced electric. The use of hundreds of modular dish-sterling systems at an installation, similar to wind farms that are being considered for utility applications. The earth receives about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world throughout the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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Lead Acid Maintenance Free Battery - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

-
Plant capacity: 834 Nos./dayPlant & machinery: Rs. 66 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Rs. 1179 Lakhs
Return: 52.00%Break even: 30.00%
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Information
  • One Lac / Lakh / Lakhs is equivalent to one hundred thousand (100,000)
  • One Crore is equivalent to ten million (10,000,000)
  • T.C.I is Total Capital Investment
  • We can modify the project capacity and project cost as per your requirement.
  • We can also prepare project report on any subject as per your requirement.
  • Caution: The project's cost, capacity and return are subject to change without any notice. Future projects may have different values of project cost, capacity or return.

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