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Power Project, Power Generation Plants, Hydroelectric Power, Gas-Fired Power Station, Coal, Thermal, Water, Hydro, Wind, Solar, Agro, Biogas Based Power Plants, Electrical Power Industry, Alternative, Renewable Power Generation, Electricity Generation

India possesses one of the largest power generation capacities in the world (its current ranking is fifth) with an installed capacity of 156,000 MW which is about 4 percent of global power generation. The top four countries, viz., US, Japan, China and Russia together consume about 49 percent of the total power generated globally. The average per capita consumption of electricity in India is estimated to be 704kWh during 2008-09. The power sector has emerged as major focus area for the government both central and state. However, it suffers from power shortages estimated at 14-15 per cent, with the figure higher in the northern and western regions.  

India's generation capacity of 2,300 MW in 1950 expanded to over 116,500 MW including non-utilities at the end 2000-01. The total installed capacity of electric power generation further increased to 141,080 MW in 2007-08 (upto January 2008) compared to a capacity of 128,000 MW during the same period in 2006-07. The Eleventh Plan has targeted a capacity addition of 78,570 MW. The five years (2007-2012) may be the best of times for power equipment makers with the power sector on an expansion spree. With order-book growth expanding over the last three years, there is a good chance that this will continue. Close to 82% of the planned generation capacity for the Tenth Plan was either implemented or was in the process of being implemented. Even assuming a 70% implementation ratio for the Eleventh Plan, close to 55,000 MW will be added. Five ultra mega power projects, totaling 20,000 MW are coming up in 2008. In the transmission sector, for example, Power Grid Corporation is planning a capex of Rs 710 billion by 2010.

Earlier, the shortfalls in achieving the Plan targets of addition to power generation and up-gradation of transmission and distribution had adversely affected the electrical equipment industry. The peak shortage which was over 11% of the requirement in 2003-04 increased to 11.7% in 2004-05 and to over 12% in 2005-06. The shortage further rose to about 14% in 2006-07. In the ten months of 2007-08 the peak shortage had risen to over 15% of the peak demand of 107,010 MW.

The national grid envisage 200,000 MW transmission capacity and 37,700 MW of inter-regional power transfer capacity (current inter-regional power transfer capacity is 20,750 MW) to ensure smooth transfer of power from power –surplus to power-deficit regions.

According to the Power Ministry, the power sector has tied up Rs 2,240 billion worth of investments to build power plants with 70,000 MW capacities in the next three years. The Indian government has set ambitious goals in the 11th plan for power sector owing to which the power sector is poised for significant expansion. In order to provide availability of over 1000 units of per capita electricity by year 2012, it has been estimated that need-based capacity addition of more than 100,000 MW would be required. This has resulted in massive addition plans being proposed in the sub-sectors of Generation Transmission and Distribution. Investment is also expected to flow into different segments of the value chain, covering the segments of power generation, transmission and distribution and allied sectors such as equipment, technology and services. The private sector is expected to play a more active role in investment and capital productivity. The government has undertaken a number of initiatives to facilitate private sector participation.

With some fast moves at launching fast track projects to augment supplies, the Indian industry needs to improve its competitiveness. The Indian market is growing and multinationals with newer technologies are now more active.

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Each detailed project reports cover all the aspects of business, from analysing the market, confirming availability of various necessities such as plant & machinery, raw materials to forecasting the financial requirements. The scope of the report includes assessing market potential, negotiating with collaborators, investment decision making, corporate diversification planning etc. in a very planned manner by formulating detailed manufacturing techniques and forecasting financial aspects by estimating the cost of raw material, formulating the cash flow statement, projecting the balance sheet etc.

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Solar Power Plant - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Direct conversion of daylight into electricity by photovoltaic or solar-thermal conversion system is the most promising renewable energy options that have emerged in the recent years. The earth receiver about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world through out the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydroelectric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy. So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The challenge however lies in just how much energy solar power would have to displace if it were to become the dominant source of energy in the world. In 2006, according to the International Energy Agency, 80.3% of the world's energy came from fossil fuel: Oil (34.3%), coal (25.1%) and gas (20.9%). Fully 90.9% of the world's energy came from combustion, because alongside these fossil fuels in 4th place are "combustible renewables," mostly wood (10.6%). Include nuclear power (6.5%) and hydro-electric power (2.2%), and you have accounted for 99.5% of the world's energy! So where does solar fit into this equation? Most of this last half-percent of one percent of the world's energy, .41%, is provided from geothermal sources. The energy we love so much, wind and solar, currently only provide .064% and .039% of the world's power requirements. Put another way, for solar energy achieve its potential and replace all other sources of energy in the world, this .039% would have to increase 2,500 times. Moreover, since nations such as India and China have only begun to industrialize, and since the industrialized nations only comprise approximately 20% of the world's population yet consume over 50% of the world's energy production, it is unlikely that global energy production will not have to increase. It is these sobering realities that should inform any reading of the potential of solar power. India's power sector has a total installed capacity of approximately 102,000 MW of which 60% is coal-based, 25% hydro, and the balance gas and nuclear-based. Power shortages are estimated at about 11% of total energy and 15% of peak capacity requirements and are likely to increase in the coming years. In the next 10 years, another 10,000 MW of capacity is required. The bulk of capacity additions involve coal thermal stations supplemented by hydroelectric plant development. Coal-based power involve environmental concerns relating to emissions of suspended particulate matter (SPM), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, methane and other gases. On the other hand, large hydro plants can lead to soil degradation and erosion, loss of forests, wildlife habitat and species diversity and most importantly, the displacement of people. To promote environmentally sound energy investments as well as help mitigate the acute shortfall in power supply, the Government of India is promoting the accelerated development of the country's renewable energy resources and has made it a priority thrust area under India's National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP). The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). Throughout the 1990's, India's private sector interest in renewable energy increased due to several factors: (i) India opened the power sector to private sector participation in 1991; (ii) tax incentives are now offered to developers of renewable energy systems; (iii) there has been a heightened awareness of the environmental benefits of renewable energy relative to conventional forms and of the short-gestation period for developing alternate energy schemes. Recognizing the opportunities afforded by private sector participation, the Indian Government revised its priorities in July 1993 by giving greater emphasis on promoting renewable energy technologies for power generation. To date, over 1,500 MW of windfarm capacity has been commissioned and about 1,423 MW capacity of small hydro installed. India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. The main objectives of the project are these: (i) To demonstrate the operational viability of parabolic trough solar thermal power generation in India; (ii) support solar power technology development to help lead to a reduction in production cost; and (iii) help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) global emissions in the longer term. Specifically, operational viability will be demonstrated through operation of a solar thermal plant with commercial power sales and delivery arrangements with the grid. Technology development would be supported through technical assistance and training. The project would be pursued under The World Bank's Global Environment Fund (GEF) -- which has a leading program objective focused on climate change. This project is envisaged as the first step of a long term program for promoting solar thermal power in India that would lead to a phased deployment of similar systems in the country and possibly in other developing nations. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry. One of the prime objectives of the demonstration project is to ensure capacity build-up through 'hands on' experience in the design, operation and management of such projects under actual field conditions. Involvement in the project of various players in the energy sector, such as local industries, the private construction and operations contractors, Rajasthan State Power Corporation Limited (RSPCL), Rajasthan State Electricity Board (RSEB), Rajasthan Energy Development Agency (REDA), Central Electricity Authority (CEA), MNES and others, will help to increase the capacity and capability of local technical expertise and further sustain the development of solar power in India in the longer term.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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DAIRY FARMING WITH POWER PLANT BASED ON DUNG - Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

The importance of milk in human diet especially for children and expectant and nursing matters is vital. To meet the demand of the increasing population milk production in India has to be increased upto about 70 million tonnes by 2008 AD. More than 60% of the families involved in dairying belong to the small or marginal farmers or even agricultural labourers. The term power plant is often used loosely to designate any plant in which steam is generated regardless of whether power is produced. Power generated by cow dung makes the project more viable. Milk and milk products play a vital role in the countrys agricultural economy. The milk production is expected to surge forward in the coming years. The annual milk production has more than doubled in the last two decades. As much 90% of this production comes from only 12 states. New comers may successfully venture into this field.
Plant capacity: 27000 Kgs. Milk / Day, 5 MW Power Plant Based on Cow Dung Plant & machinery: 4 Crores
Working capital: -T.C.I: 25 Crores
Return: 43.00%Break even: 32.00%
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GOOD OPPORTUNITY IN SOLAR POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

In case of Photovoltaic or direct conversion of sunlight to electricity via solar cell, the efficiencies limited to about 20 percent of the absorbed sunlight. Solar thermal conversion involves the production of shaft power and of electricity via a thermodynamic cycle. In this cycle, a heat engine is driven by energy absorbed from sunlight. The heat engine is the principal feature that distinguishes the discipline of solar-thermal electricity from photovoltaic or home heating and cooling. All heat engines are limited in performance by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics. To achieve the higher temperature associated with heat engine efficiency places special requirement on the solar collector used. The collector must be designed either to suppress normal loses that is, those due to radiation, convection or conduction-or to enhance the intensity of the incident solar energy by optical concentration. Finally, to provide a useful quantity of energy at a central location, some degree of power concentration is often required. Solar thermal systems for generating electricity use tracking mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight on to a receiver, where it is converted to high temperature thermal energy. The high-temperature heat in the receiver is then used to drive a heat engine and electric generator to produce electricity. Currently, three architectures for Solar Thermal Systems show promise for generating; parabolic troughs, central receivers, and parabolic dishes. In parabolic trough systems, sunlight is focused on to a receiver tube that runs along the focal line of the collector. Through collectors typically track the sun in one axis. A central receiver system uses a field of heliostats, or sun-tracking mirrors, to focus sunlight on to a tower-mounted receiver. And in a parabolic dish system, both the parabolic mirror and receiver track the sun. Many system configurations are possible. However, the architectures and optical characteristics of solar thermal systems influence the choice of receiver, power conversion equipment, and scale of systems. In typical trough systems, the relatively low concentration ratios (typically 20X - 100X), as well as the inherent economics of scale of steam-Rankine power conversion equipment have led to a large-scale power plants which use a heat transfer oil to collect solar heat in the receiver tube. Central receivers because of higher concentration ratios, typically a few hundred times, and the centrally located receiver have evolved towards molten-salt systems with thermal storage capabilities. Steam-Rankine central receiver systems are also cost effective at large scales, Dish-engine systems, in which the concentrator and receiver track the sun, achieve concentration ratios over 1000 X, and require small eternally heated power converters that are efficient and low cost. Sterling engines located at the focus of the dish have shown the most promise for producing competitively priced electric. The use of hundreds of modular dish-sterling systems at an installation, similar to wind farms that are being considered for utility applications. The earth receives about 75,000 trillion KW of energy from the sun every day. Just 0.1 percent of this is sufficient to meet the energy requirements of the world. Putting this in a different way, at noon, the solar energy striking an area of 70 miles long by 70 mile wide, if converted into photovoltaic electricity, would equal to the peak capacity of all existing power plant in the world. With the ever growing demand for electric power and continuously depleting fossil fuels such as coal, oil and gas various alternative sources of energy have been resorted to by advanced nations. While wind, geothermal and water power are safe to use, they can not be tapped at all times in all places. Ocean and tidal power generation are yet to take off as viable alternatives. Tapping nuclear power poses problems of waste disposal and safety aspects. Most of the processes involve a lot of capital as well as recurring expenditure. Solar power has an edge over all the other non-conventional forms of energy sources as it is non-polluting. The solar energy is abundant and is available at all parts of the world throughout the year. Although no alternative energy sources can compete with plentiful, low cost fossil fuel, the days when we can rely on the availability of such fuels are limited. There seems to be no reasons why the solar thermal electricity option should not be pursued aggressively, and if it is, this option can begin to impact our energy requirement in the coming years. Using sunlight to create electrical and thermal energy remains the most promising source of clean renewable energy, and projections as to how quickly solar power takes off could be grossly understated. The Indian government estimates that a potential of 50,000 MW of power capacity can be harnessed from new and renewable energy sources but due to relatively high development cost experienced in the past these were not tapped as aggressively as conventional sources. Nevertheless, development of alternate energy has been part of India's strategy for expanding energy supply and meeting decentralized energy needs of the rural sector. The program, considered one of the largest among developing countries, is administered through India's Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources (MNES), energy development agencies in the various States, and the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency Limited (IREDA). India is located in the equatorial sun belt of the earth, thereby receiving abundant radiant energy from the sun. The India Meteorological Department maintains a nationwide network of radiation stations, which measure solar radiation, and also the daily duration of sunshine. In most parts of India, clear sunny weather is experienced 250 to 300 days a year. The annual global radiation varies from 1600 to 2200 kWh/sq. m. which is comparable with radiation received in the tropical and sub-tropical regions. The equivalent energy potential is about 6,000 million GWh of energy per year. The highest annual global radiation is received in Rajasthan and northern Gujarat. In Rajasthan, large areas of land are barren and sparsely populated, making these areas suitable as locations for large central power stations based on solar energy. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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Lead Acid Maintenance Free Battery - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

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Plant capacity: 834 Nos./dayPlant & machinery: Rs. 66 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Rs. 1179 Lakhs
Return: 52.00%Break even: 30.00%
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GAS BASED POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation industry in the late 1940s, it was a revolutionary self-contained fossil-fueled power plant. Gas turbine generators are self-contained packaged power plants. Air compression, fuel delivery, combustion, expansion of combustion gas through a turbine and electricity generation are all accomplished in a compact combination of equipment, usually provided by a single supplier under a single contract. Most gas turbine application relies on natural gas. Gas turbines are frequently used in both single and combined cycle configuration. In single system the gas turbine is operated alone without the benefit of recovering any of the energy in the hot exhaust gases. Combined cycle configuration vary consist of one or more gas turbines exhaust into one or more heat recovery steam are: (i) Short schedule for design, installation and start up (2) Higher overall efficiency (3) Good cycling capability (4) Fast started and loaded (5) Lower pollutant emissions (6) More compact site power installed. Due to shortage of power supply, installation of more power plants is necessary. Viewing the same, scope for installing more power plants is very good. New entrants can come up into this field.
Plant capacity: 25 MWPlant & machinery: 100 Crores
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 110 Crores
Return: 44.00%Break even: 20.00%
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CAPTIVE POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Robust power generation and an effective delivery model determine the bullish economic growth of a country. A weak power infrastructure impedes the growth potential and pulls back the growth initiates. Captive power plants are essentially non-utility power plants. These plants are owned by specific industries, which consume all the power produced for its production purposes. The size of these power plants varies from 0.25 MW to 300 MW. The fuel used by these plants is diesel, coal, gas and hydro. The power supply gap between the required energy and available energy is increasing every day. Hence, it comes as no surprise that the government is focusing more on the renewable sources of energy. There is good scope for new captive power plant.
Plant capacity: 5 MWPlant & machinery: 1733 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 2097 Lakhs
Return: 33.00%Break even: 34.00%
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SUGAR MILL, DISTILLERY AND POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities

India is now the largest producer of sugar in the world. Although subject to cyclical fluctuations, sugar production has grown phenomenally in the mid-1990s. It expanded from 14.6 mn tonnes in 1994-95 to 16.5 mn tonnes in 1995-96, representing a growth of 18% in one year. The next two years witnessed a sharp fall to below 13 mn tonnes in 1997-98. Keeping to the cyclical nature of the industry, the years following witnessed a smart rise in production to 15.5 mn and 18.2 mn tonnes in 1998-99 and 1999-00, respectively. This marked a satisfactory upward movement at over 12% in the period 1996 to 2000. The country had a total supply of 31.5 mn tonnes in 2002-03. With consumption pegged at 18.4 mn tonnes and exports at 1.5 mn tonnes, it was left with stocks of 11.6 mn tonnes by end September 2003. A large number of sugar producing companies, 144 out of 564, remained closed during the season. India continued to have a comfortable demand-supply position throughout the 1990s, inspite of fluctuations in production. On a longer term, there was no reason for importing sugar. The country, however, went ahead and imported sizable quantities in the 1997-2000 period. At the same time sugar exports expanded to 1.2 mn tonnes in 2000-01 and to 1.5 mn tonnes in 2002-03. The import quotas are decided by the government and do not attract import duty. The industry complains that while there was no duty on imported sugar, nor even a countervailing duty, the local industry is subject to various kinds of levies such as purchase tax, cane cess and excise duty. WTO prescribes a maximum duty of 150% on sugar. In the US, the import duty on sugar is as high as 130%. India is the only country which allowed sugar to be imported at zero duty. Most countries imposing such high tariffs are industrial countries with less than 5% of the population depending on agriculture. The Indian Sugar Mills Association has been for futures trading in sugar to provide a cushion to the industry once decontrolled. The National Federation of Cooperative Sugar Mills, the apex organisation of 250 cooperative sugar mills accounting for nearly 60% of country's sugar production, did not support it. The government has removed all restrictions on sugar exports and permitted commencement of future trading in white sugar. Ethanol is an organic alcohol with a wide range of uses, both industrially and recreationally. It has a relatively simple manufacturing process making it readily available and cheap to manufacture. The main raw material for the ethanol is molasses available in sugar mills. Co generation is the simultaneous of process heat and electric power using single fuel. Per capita power consumption is a barometer of country prosperity, economic growth and industrialization. Co-generation power plant based on bagasse makes use of generation of power from fuel of bagasse. This is regarded as the clever way of converting waste into useful energy. In sugar industry, it is required to product both steam and the electricity for driving the sugar processing. To venture into this integrated plant is very profitable.
Plant capacity: Sugar Mill Cap. 5000 Crushing/Day,Distillery Cap. 60000 Ltrs/Day, Power Plant Cap. 28 MW Plant & machinery: 68 Crores
Working capital: -T.C.I: 162 Crores
Return: 48.00%Break even: 31.00%
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THERMAL POWER PLANT (5 MW) - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Investment Opportunities, Cost and Revenue

Power generation is an essential requirement of economic growth of a country. Generation involves with the production of power and transmission and distribution function is of carrying the generated power to the doorsteps of the consumer. Indias per capita power consumption was 490 units in 2004-05, one third compared with 1,500 units of China. Indias consumption stood around 644 units in 2007-08 at an annual average growth of 10.47% and, during the same period, Chinas consumption has grown at 12 to 13% per annum to cater to its economic growth. Large number of power plants of varied types and sizes exist in the country. These are utilized in process industry. Thermal plants inducing co-generating power plants could, therefore, play a supplementary role in meeting the countrys power demand. A weak power infrastructure impedes the growth potential and pulls back the growth initiates. Thermal power plants are owned by specific industries, which consume all the power produced for its production purposes. Every person, who has constructed a thermal power plant and maintains and operates such plant, shall have the right to open access for the purposes of carrying electricity from his/her thermal power plant to the destination of his/her use; provided that such open access shall be subject to availability of adequate transmission facility and such availability of transmission facility shall be determined by the Central Government. The power supply gap between the required energy and available energy is increasing everyday.
Plant capacity: 5 MWPlant & machinery: 1753 Lakhs
Working capital: -T.C.I: Cost of Project : 2076 Lakhs
Return: 52.00%Break even: 29.00%
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SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAICS-A VIABLE FUTURE ALTERNATIVE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study

Solar energy is an enormous resource that is readily available in all countries throughout the world, and all the space above the earth. It can be used everywhere, and can, in principal, satisfy most of India’s energy demand from a renewable, safe and clean resources. Most of all, it reduces the impact of energy production and consumption. With a population of 683 million, living in an area of about 3.28 million sq km, India has one of the lowest energy consumption per capita in the world; the equivalent of about 315 kg of coal per annum. Approximately 40% of this energy comes from non-commercial sources such as firewood, animal dung, agricultural waste etc. The electrical energy consumption per capita is only about 172KWh compared with a world average of 1700 KWh. The recent energy crisis has predictably resulted in a search for economically viable renewable energy sources suitable for large-scale utilization. India should accelerate the use of all forms of renewable energy (photovoltaic, thermal solar, solar lamps, solar pumps, wind power, biomass, biogas, and hydro), and more proactively promote energy efficiency. India must accelerate its investment in renewable energy resources, specifically solar and wind energy. The technological maturity achieved has naturally guided the Indian planners seriously to consider solar photovoltaic energy sources, among others, as viable future alternatives. The current levels of dependence on fossil fuels, the need of reducing the carbon emissions associated with energy use and the prospects of developing a new and extremely innovative technology sector, make photovoltaics increasingly attractive. Photovoltaics are devices which directly convert sunlight into electricity. The solar cell is the elementary building block of the photovoltaic technology. Solar cells are made of semiconductor materials, such as silicon. One of the properties of semiconductors that makes them most useful is that their conductivity may easily be modified by introducing impurities into their crystal lattice. Solar photovoltaic energy sources produce D.C. electricity directly from solar energy. A number of solar cells electrically connected to each other and mounted in a single support structure or frame is called a ‘photovoltaic module’. Modules are designed to supply electricity at a certain voltage. The current produced is directly dependent on the intensity of light reaching the module. Several modules can be wired together to form an array. Photovoltaic modules and arrays produce direct-current electricity. They can be connected in both series and parallel electrical arrangements to produce any required voltage and current combination. There are two main types of photovoltaic system. Grid connected systems (on-grid systems) are connected to the grid and inject the electricity into the grid. For this reason, the direct current produced by the solar modules is converted into a grid-compatible alternating current. However, solar power plants can also be operated without the grid and are then called autonomous systems (off-grid systems). More than 90 % of photovoltaic systems worldwide are currently implemented as grid-connected systems. The power conditioning unit also monitors the functioning of the system and the grid and switches off the system in case of faults. Solar photovoltaic energy sources can be deployed either as centralized or as distributed systems. At present, the centralized schemes have little importance in the context of India. Of the three schemes of distributed sources, the community-based and the user-owned stand-alone systems are of importance to India. Although it has been recognized in India that the major impact of solar photovoltaic sources will be in lift irrigation, there are a large number of other potential areas of application where photovoltaic can make an effective contribution. These include diverse areas such as individual home lighting, rural lighting, offshore oil platforms, rural communication system, weather monitoring systems and many more. The National Solar Mission, with an ambitious target of achieving 20,000 MW capacity by 2030 under the national action plan on climate change, will also be in operation this year with the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy's plan budget being increased by 61% from Rs 617 crore to Rs 998 crore. The target: 200 MW grid power and 32 MW equivalent off-grid solar power to be installed in the next financial year. Custom duty has also been pegged at a low 5% on equipment for solar photovoltaic and solar thermal power. These equipments will also be exempted from central excise duties. Excise will also be reduced from 8% to 4% on LED lights. Photovoltaic technology is safe, clean, robust and proven to be efficient and highly scalable. Photovoltaics are easy to introduce and implemented all over the world, in both developed and developing countries. Thus renewable technologies are a clear opportunity for India to establish and reinforce a competitive edge in a highly innovative industrial sector. It is currently in a position to lead the worldwide effort to reduce harmful emissions from energy systems and strengthen its industrial basis, thus also creating new skilled jobs. India should begin creating a mainstream solar energy market with the goal of making solar power cost-competitive with fossil fuel-generated electricity in the near future. India will strongly prioritize the use of solar thermal energy as a solution to the climate and energy crisis. India’s solar energy holds great promise.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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GOOD FUTURE PROSPECTS FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT - Manufacturing Plant, Detailed Project Report, Profile, Business Plan, Industry Trends, Market Research, Survey, Manufacturing Process, Machinery, Raw Materials, Feasibility Study, Production Schedule

The growing industrialization and associated use of energy have led the world to face energy crisis which is gaining serious concern day by day. In principle, solar energy can supply all the present and future energy needs of the world on a continuous basis. This makes it one of the most promising of the non-conventional energy sources. India has made marked gains in the construction of both hydro-electric and thermal power generating plants. Installed generating capacity has increased manifold since demand has increased at an even faster rate. Thus the burden of power generation is still on fossil fuels. Solar energy can play an important role in meeting energy demands in future years. Thus greater stress should be given on technical development for collection and storage of solar energy. If this solar energy is converted to electricity this can meet the growing demands. Thus Indian Industries will get a great benefit. Solar systems are powered by energy from the sun. Two generic types of solar-electric systems are solar photovoltaics and solar thermal electric. The direct utilization based on thermal and photovoltaic are of prime importance because it involves both storage and conversion into chemical as well as electrical form of energy. Solar thermal technologies convert radiant energy from the sun of thermal energy. For low-temperature applications (typically below about 200ºF [95ºC]) such as domestic water heating, concentration of the sunlight is not required. To achieve the high temperatures required for generation of electrical power, the solar energy must be concentrated. All solar thermal electric technologies include a collector, which redirects and concentrates the insolation on a receiver. In the receiver, the solar energy is absorbed, heating a fluid that powers a heat engine to generate electricity. In some systems, a heat exchanger may be used for power generation. Three principal solar thermal concentrator concepts are currently under development for power generation: parabolic trough, central receiver, and parabolic dish. The parabolic trough is the most advanced of the concentrator systems. This technology is used in the largest grid connected solar-thermal power plants in the world. A parabolic trough collector has a linear parabolic-shaped reflector that focuses the sun's radiation on a linear receiver located at the focus of the parabola. The collector tracks the sun along one axis from east to west during the day to ensure that the sun is continuously focused on the receiver. Because of its parabolic shape, a trough can focus the sun at 30 to 100 times its normal intensity (concentration ratio) on a receiver pipe located along the focal line of the trough, achieving operating temperatures over 400 degrees Celcius. A collector field consists of a large field of single-axis tracking parabolic trough collectors. The solar field is modular in nature and is composed of many parallel rows of solar collectors aligned on a north-south horizontal axis. A working (heat transfer) fluid is heated as it circulates through the receivers and returns to a series of heat exchangers at a central location where the fluid is used to generate high-pressure superheated steam. The steam is then fed to a conventional steam turbine/generator to produce electricity. After the working fluid passes through the heat exchangers, the cooled fluid is recirculated through the solar field. The plant is usually designed to operate at full rated power using solar energy alone, given sufficient solar energy. Flat Plate Collectors are the most common type of solar water heating systems for residential and commercial applications. Flat plate collector systems are used comfort heating of a home or commercial building in the winter and for domestic hot water production throughout the year. Flat plate collectors usually heat water to temperatures ranging from 150º to 200º F (66º to 93º C). The efficiency of flat plate collectors varies from manufacturer to manufacturer, and system to system, but usually ranges from as low as 20% to as high as 80%. Solar thermal power is one of the most promising ways to provide renewable energy, giving the fact that it can compete in the middle/long term with conventional power plants. As a result of international cooperation and government grants, many demonstration projects have been carried out or are still in progress. India supports development of both solar thermal and solar photovoltaics (PV) power generation. To demonstrate and commercialize solar thermal technology in India, MNES is promoting megawatt scale projects such as the proposed 35MW solar thermal plant in Rajasthan and is encouraging private sector projects by providing financial assistance from the Ministry. Involvement in the project of various players in the energy sector, such as local industries, the private construction and operations contractors, Rajasthan State Power Corporation Limited (RSPCL), Rajasthan State Electricity Board (RSEB), Rajasthan Energy Development Agency (REDA), Central Electricity Authority (CEA), MNES and others, will help to increase the capacity and capability of local 5technical expertise and further sustain the development of solar power in India in the longer term.
Plant capacity: -Plant & machinery: -
Working capital: -T.C.I: -
Return: 1.00%Break even: N/A
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  • One Lac / Lakh / Lakhs is equivalent to one hundred thousand (100,000)
  • One Crore is equivalent to ten million (10,000,000)
  • T.C.I is Total Capital Investment
  • We can modify the project capacity and project cost as per your requirement.
  • We can also prepare project report on any subject as per your requirement.
  • Caution: The project's cost, capacity and return are subject to change without any notice. Future projects may have different values of project cost, capacity or return.

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